Spay and Neuter

 

 

"Every year, millions of unwated dogs and cats, including puppies and kittens, are euthanized. The good news is that responsible pet owners can make a difference. By having your dog or cat sterilized, you will do your part to prevent the birth of unwanted puppies and kittens. Spaying and neutering prevent unwanted litters and may reduce many if the behavioral problems associated with the mating instinct."-American Veterinary Medical Assocation

 


 

DOGS: 
 

Males-The normal behavior of an un-neutered dog is often incompatible with being a household pet. Intact dogs tend to wander from home, seeking a mate or defending their territory. This puts them at risk for being hit by a car or being injured in a dogfight. Urine marking and some types of aggression are more pronounced in un-neutered dogs as well. Although neutering may not entirely eliminate these behaviors, it can diminish them by 50-90%. 

Intact male dogs suffer from a high incidence of inflammation and enlargement of the prostate, as well as testicular tumors. Older dogs commonly develop swollen and infected prostate glands. These conditions are painful and can interfere with urination, defecation and cause other problems. After neutering, the prostate shrinks considerably. Tumors of the testicles, common in older intact male dogs, are eliminated entirely. 

Females-Unspayed female dogs usually go through two heat periods each year. During her heat period, your female dog may drip blood. She will also make every effort to sneak out to find a mate. As a result, she is at high risk for being hit by a car. Unspayed female dogs suffer from a high incidence of mammary tumors, false pregnancies, uterine infections, and reproductive cancers. Breast tumors are the most common type of cancer in dogs. One out of every four unspayed dogs will get breast cancer, and half of the tumors are malignant. Unspayed dogs are also prone to pyometra, a life-threatening infection of the uterus. Spaying removes the possibility of diseases of the ovaries and uterus, and comes greatly decreases the development of mammary tumors, especially if done before the first heat cycle. 

 

 

 

CATS: 

Females-Unspayed female cats can go through several heats in one year. Cats are induced ovulators, so they do not actually ovulate, until there is mating with a male cat.. During her heat period, your female cat may be much more vocal and have increased activity. The cat may roll around or stand with her rear up in the air. She will also make every effort to sneak out to find a mate. As a result, she is at high risk for being hit by a car. Unspayed female cats suffer from a high incidence of mammary tumors, false pregnancies, uterine infections, and reproductive cancers. Spaying your cat greatly reduces the risks of these cancers. It has been said that it may be beneficial to let your cat produce one litter of kittens before she is spayed; however, this is not true. 


Males-The normal behavior of an un-neutered cat is often incompatible with being a household pet. Intact cats tend to wander from home, seeking a mate or defending their territory. This puts them at risk for being hit by a car or being injured in a fight. Urine marking and some types of aggression are more pronounced in un-neutered cats as well. Although neutering may not entirely eliminate these behaviors, it can diminish them by 50-90%. Since un-neutered male cats are more prone to get in cat fights. They are more susceptible to the deadly Feline Leukemia and FIV viruses. 

The Benefits of Spaying and Neutering

•Presurgical Examination 

•Anesthesia 
•Spay / Neuter Procedure Itself & Surgical Supplies Required 
•Surgical Recovery & Suture Removal (If Required) In 10-14 Days 
•Pain Management 

 

 

 

 

 

Above is the minimal procedure package offered to make

spaying/neutering as affordable as possible. There are several

optional treatments that are highly recommended for your pet’s 

increased safety & comfort, which include the following:

 

•Pre-anesthetic blood work* 
•Intravenous catheter and fluids* 
•Additional Pain Management to go home 
•Elizabethan Collar 


*These procedures are required if your pet is 7 years or older. 

 

 

 

 

Pre-anesthetic Profile-This blood panel is performed at our hospital before the procedure on the day of the surgery. This blood panel requires a small amount of blood and takes about 30 minutes to get the results. The results tell us your pet’s cell count, kidney, heart, and liver functions. This information is just a precaution to help ensure the safety of your pet. The blood panel can also be used as a baseline if your pet ever becomes sick in the future. 

What is included in the price?

Optional Additional precautions:

How do these optional treatments benefit my pet?

Intravenous catheter and fluids-An intravenous catheter (IV) is typically placed in the leg of your pet. The area to place the catheter is prepared by shaving a small area and preparing that area with an aseptic betadine solution. The IV allows for direct access to a vein in case an emergency arises during surgery. The IV also allows for your pet to be on Normasol or Lactated Ringers while under anesthesia. Since anesthesia can cause a drop in your pet’s blood pressure, fluid therapy helps to regulate the blood pressure. It is important to maintain blood pressure in order to make sure all the tissues and organs have proper blood flow. 

 

Additional Pain Management to go home-Pets, like humans, all have a different tolerance for pain. Some pets who do not receive additional pain management to go home are happy and wagging there tails when the leave after surgery. 

 

Elizabethan Collar-The collar is a special type of restraint device which looks like a lampshade. It is secured around the pet’s head/neck to help prevent the pet from licking, chewing, or scratching until healing is complete. Your pet may harm themself by rubbing, scratching, or chewing their wounds, bandages, or surgical incisions. It is a common misconception that a pet’s saliva helps to heal a wound. In reality, the abrasive action of the tongue usually makes matters worse rather than better and slows down the healing process. 

Pets can eat, drink, and sleep with the collar on. After an initial 1-2 hour period of strange behavior, most pets accept the collar without further concern. The plastic collar can be cleaned by wiping with a wet cloth. The collar can be removed for cleaning but otherwise should be left on the pet at all times. 
After the surgery has healed and the collar is not needed, do NOT throw it away. Keep it for future use. Pets routinely develop problems where excessive licking aggravates the condition. Using the collar to prevent additional trauma to the irritated area can often successfully treat skin rashes at home. To save the collar, simply remove the long plastic strap that is threaded through the two ends of the collar to make the cone shape. The collar can then be laid flat in the bottom of a drawer for convenient storage.

What to Expect

Please be sure that your pet has no food after 10pm on the evening before the surgery. Please allow your pet to drink water. 


•Exercise your pet before coming in, as activity will be restricted for the next several days. 
•Please drop your pet off in the morning before 8:30am. 
•Please be sure to allow 15-20 minutes to admit your pet for surgery so that we may address any questions you may have and have all the paperwork together. 
•Be sure to tell us about any concerns you may have about your pet before surgery. 
•Ask questions! We want to make sure you understand everything about your pet’s surgery. 


While your pet is here:


Once you leave your pet for surgery we will begin preparing them for surgery. A temperature, pulse, and respiration will be taken and the doctor will perform a physical examination on your pet. We will perform all preanesthetic bloodwork, intravenous catheter, and fluids. Your pet will then rest comfortably until it is time for surgery. We typically do 8-10 surgeries in a day. Once your pet is in recovery we will call you to inform you about the surgery and establish a convenient time for discharge. At the time of discharge a technician will carefully review home care instructions and answer all of your questions. 

 

After Surgery:

 

Your pet has just undergone surgery. While welcoming him home, there are some things to remember to assure a speedy recovery. 

Anesthesia 
Your pet may not feel himself for the next 12 to 24 hours. Keep him in a warm, quiet area, away from other pets, where he can rest and is not likely to injure himself. An airline kennel or a small room is ideal. Never feed or give water to a dog that still seems groggy. Once your pet seems awake and alert, take things slow. Some anesthetics can cause nausea. Introduce water first. If all goes well, a small amount of food can be offered a few hours later. Wait until the next day to return to his normal feeding schedule. 


Exercise 
Your pet should be kept quiet the dsy of surgery. During the next week, his exercise should be restricted moderately. Short leash walks are OK unless advised otherwise. Discourage vigorous running, jumping, or rough play. Avoid leaving him unattended with other pets with whom he normally rough-houses. Excessive exercise after surgery can cause swelling and delayed healing. 

Environment and Grooming 
Keep your pet in a warm place today and tonight, preferably indoors. Make sure his bedding and the area where he lives are especially clean and dry. 
Because the incision should stay dry, do not bathe your pet or allow him to swim for at least one week. If the area around his incision appears soiled, you can carefully wipe his skin with warm water and a mild antiseptic soap, then rinse by wiping with plain water. Avoid getting soap or water directly on the incision. 

Self-Trauma 
A surgical incision may feel sore, itchy, or just different to your pet. His natural instinct is to lick, scratch or chew. If you notice him bothering his incision, he might need an Elizabethan collar. The Elizabethan collar should be worn at all times when you are not watching him, its amazing how quickly your pet can pull out a stitch when you turn your back. 

Monitoring 
Check your pets incision daily. Notify our office if you see any increase in swelling, discharge, bleeding, redness, or if you think stitches might be missing. 
If your pet has a cast or bandage, check it daily to be sure its dry, clean, and has no foul odor. Bandages can be kept clean and dry during trips outdoors by putting a plastic bag over the limb and taping it in place. 

 

Medications 
If your pet has medication, thoroughly read and follow all label instructions. If you have any questions, our office can help. Always use the medication for the full duration prescribed, even if your pet seems better sooner. 

 

Getting Help 
Never hesitate to call our office, 602-277-1464 if you think your dog may be having a problem. Your diligence may catch a complication before it becomes serious. 

 

ALTA VISTA VETERINARY HOSPITAL

  • Facebook - Black Circle
  • Instagram - Black Circle

4706 N. 7th Ave

Phoenix, Arizona 85013

602-277-1464

WALK-IN'S WELCOME